Facing the Complexities of Womens Sexual Desire

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From the reviews: "Something of riveting interest in almost every chapter The essence of the book is many brief descriptions of important issues, along with some longer discussions as well. The brief descriptions make this a very readable book Overall, this is a terrific book that is sure to tell the reader new things about women's sexuality. Vera Sonja Maass is a psychologist in private practice as well as a consulting psychologist to the Grey Clinic, Indianapolis, Indiana.

She received her Ph. Not every woman experiences the negative side effects of the pill, however, as many as one in four do. In turn, high SHBG levels have been associated with a decline in sexual desire. Sexual desire is said to be influenced by androgens in men and by androgens and estrogens in women. Testosterone is mainly synthesized in the testes in men and in the ovaries in women. Exogenous administration of moderate amounts of oxytocin has been found to stimulate females to desire and seek out sexual activity.

In males, the frequency of ejaculations affects the libido. If the gap between ejaculations extends toward a week, there will be a stronger desire for sexual activity. There are a few medical interventions that can be done on individuals who feel sexually bored, experience performance anxiety, or are unable to orgasm. For everyday life, a fact sheet by the Association for Reproductive Health Professionals recommends: [38].


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The views on sexual desire and on how sexual desire should be expressed vary significantly between different societies and religions. Various ideologies range from sexual repression to hedonism. Laws on various forms sexual activity, such as homosexual acts and sex outside marriage vary by countries. Some cultures seek to restrict sexual acts to marriage.

In some countries, such as Saudi Arabia, Pakistan, [39] Afghanistan, [40] [41] Iran, [41] Kuwait, [42] Maldives, [43] Morocco, [44] Oman, [45] Mauritania, [46] United Arab Emirates, [47] [48] Sudan, [49] Yemen, [50] any form of sexual activity outside marriage is illegal. In some societies there is a double standard regarding male and female expression of sexual desire. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. For the book by Roger Scruton, see Sexual Desire book. Further information: Religion and sexuality.

The Journal of Sex Research.

Facing the Complexities of Women's Sexual Desire (Paperback)

Journal of Sex Research. Archives of Sexual Behavior.

Annual Review of Sex Research. An Interpretation of Desire. Chicago: University of Chicago. Personality and Social Psychology Review. Human Sexual Response. Ishi Press International. The Nature of Sexual Desire. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour. Sexual and Relationship Therapy. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin. She is now formulating an explanatory model of female desire that will appear later this year in Annual Review of Sex Research. She spun numerous Hula-Hoops around her minimal waist and was hoisted by a cable high above the audience, where she spread her legs wider than seemed humanly possible.

The male, without an erection, is announcing a lack of arousal. The critical part played by being desired, Julia Heiman observed, is an emerging theme in the current study of female sexuality. Meana made clear, during our conversations in a casino bar and on the U. With her graduate student Amy Lykins, she published, in Archives of Sexual Behavior last year, a study of visual attention in heterosexual men and women.

Wearing goggles that track eye movement, her subjects looked at pictures of heterosexual foreplay. The men stared far more at the females, their faces and bodies, than at the males.

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The women gazed equally at the two genders, their eyes drawn to the faces of the men and to the bodies of the women — to the facial expressions, perhaps, of men in states of wanting, and to the sexual allure embodied in the female figures. Meana has learned too from her attempts as a clinician to help patients with dyspareunia. Though she explained that the condition, which can make intercourse excruciating, is not in itself a disorder of low desire, she said that her patients reported reduced genital pain as their desire increased.

Recensie(s)

She rolled her eyes at such niceties. We hug. The generally accepted therapeutic notion that, for women, incubating intimacy leads to better sex is, Meana told me, often misguided.

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Like Chivers, Meana thinks of female sexuality as divided into two systems. But Meana conceives of those systems in a different way than her colleague. On the one hand, as Meana constructs things, there is the drive of sheer lust, and on the other the impetus of value. Meana spoke about two elements that contribute to her thinking: first, a great deal of data showing that, as measured by the frequency of fantasy, masturbation and sexual activity, women have a lower sex drive than men, and second, research suggesting that within long-term relationships, women are more likely than men to lose interest in sex.

The ravisher is so overcome by a craving focused on this particular woman that he cannot contain himself; he transgresses societal codes in order to seize her, and she, feeling herself to be the unique object of his desire, is electrified by her own reactive charge and surrenders. Meana apologized for the regressive, anti-feminist sound of the scene. Earlier, she showed me, as a joke, a photograph of two control panels, one representing the workings of male desire, the second, female, the first with only a simple on-off switch, the second with countless knobs. Women want a caveman and caring.

If I had to pick an actor who embodies all the qualities, all the contradictions, it would be Denzel Washington. He communicates that kind of power and that he is a good man. The appeal is, above all, paradoxical, Meana pointed out: rape means having no control, while fantasy is a domain manipulated by the self.

She stressed the vast difference between the pleasures of the imagined and the terrors of the real. Chivers, too, struggled over language about this subject. The topic arose because I had been drawn into her ceaseless puzzling, as could easily happen when we spent time together. I had been thinking about three ideas from our many talks: the power, for women, in being desired; the keen excitement stoked by descriptions of sex with strangers; and her positing of distinct systems of arousal and desire. This last concept seemed to confound a simpler truth, that women associate lubrication with being turned on.

We spoke, then, about the way sexual fantasies strip away the prospect of repercussions, of physical or psychological harm, and allow for unencumbered excitement, about the way they offer, in this sense, a pure glimpse into desire, without meaning — especially in the case of sexual assault — that the actual experiences are wanted. One morning in the fall, Chivers hunched over her laptop in her sparsely decorated office. She was sifting through data from her study of genital and subjective responses to audiotaped sex scenes.

She highlighted and deleted one aberrant moment, then continued peering. She would search in this way for about two hours in preparing the data of a single subject. Chivers was constantly conjuring studies she wanted to carry out, but with numberless aberrant spikes to detect and cleanse, how many could she possibly complete in one lifetime? How many could be done by all the sexologists in the world who focus on female desire, whether they were wiring women with plethysmographs or mapping the activity of their brains in fM.

What more could sexologists ever provide than intriguing hints and fragmented insights and contradictory conclusions? Could any conclusion encompass the erotic drives of even one woman? Chivers, perhaps precisely because her investigations are incisive and her thinking so relentless, sometimes seemed on the verge of contradicting her own provisional conclusions.

She spoke about helping women bring their subjective sense of lust into agreement with their genital arousal as an approach to aiding those who complain that desire eludes them. She allowed that it might. The giant forest seemed, so often, too complex for comprehension. Why is it so frightening? It was possible to imagine, then, that a scientist blinded by staring at red lines on her computer screen, or blinded by peering at any accumulation of data — a scientist contemplating, in darkness, the paradoxes of female desire — would see just as well.

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